How to Fix a Doorbell

Has your doorbell stopped working?  If it has, there are a few different factors that could be causing the problem.  If you find yourself wondering how to fix a doorbell, then you’ve come to the right place.  In this installment of our Fixt It in 15:00 series, Lou dissects the anatomy of a doorbell system to help you isolate the issue:

Have you ever wondered where the concept of the doorbell came from?  Funny enough, they’ve been around since the early 1800’s, with the earliest version being comprised of piping and compressed air.  An electrified version soon followed and the early 1900’s brought us the incarnation we know today.  Modern systems are primarily made up of the following components:

  • Low voltage wiring
  • The transformer
  • The door chime
  • The doorbell button

Understanding how each of these elements work is where we will troubleshoot the problem through the process of elimination.

  1. The Doorbell Button
    • Remove the old button from where it’s mounted and disconnect the two low voltage wires
    • Touch them together and if the doorbell rings then you know it’s the button so you’ll want to buy a new doorbell button replacement
  2. The Door Chime
    • If the previous step didn’t produce a chime sound, you’ll want to follow the same steps as before, with the door chime inside the chime box (this is usually mounted somewhere high, not too far from the door)
    • Touch the low voltage wires together and if the doorbell rings then you know it’s the chime itself that needs to be replaced
  3. The Transformer
    • This is the low voltage “brains” or component that runs the doorbell system (the doorbell transformer location is usually in the basement or mechanical room, possibly near an electrical panel)
    • Shut the power off in your house before attempting to do any work
    • Remove the old transformer and re-wire a new transformer the exact same way as it was before
  4. Low Voltage Wiring
    • If all of the previous steps don’t work, then you may have a damaged wire along the way, whether from the button to the chime or down to the transformer
    • The solution may be a splice where the wire is compromised or you may have to run all-new line

If all else fails, you can always bypass the existing system and purchase a wireless doorbell – then all you’ll have to worry about is changing the batteries every now and then!

Has your doorbell stopped working?  If it has, there are a few different factors that could be causing the problem.  If you find yourself wondering how to fix a doorbell, then you’ve come to the right place.  In this installment of our Fixt It in 15:00 series, Lou dissects the anatomy of a doorbell system to help you isolate the issue:

Have you ever wondered where the concept of the doorbell came from?  Funny enough, they’ve been around since the early 1800’s, with the earliest version being comprised of piping and compressed air.  An electrified version soon followed and the early 1900’s brought us the incarnation we know today.  Modern systems are primarily made up of the following components:

  • Low voltage wiring
  • The transformer
  • The door chime
  • The doorbell button

Understanding how each of these elements work is where we will troubleshoot the problem through the process of elimination.

  1. The Doorbell Button
    • Remove the old button from where it’s mounted and disconnect the two low voltage wires
    • Touch them together and if the doorbell rings then you know it’s the button so you’ll want to buy a new doorbell button replacement
  2. The Door Chime
    • If the previous step didn’t produce a chime sound, you’ll want to follow the same steps as before, with the door chime inside the chime box (this is usually mounted somewhere high, not too far from the door)
    • Touch the low voltage wires together and if the doorbell rings then you know it’s the chime itself that needs to be replaced
  3. The Transformer
    • This is the low voltage “brains” or component that runs the doorbell system (the doorbell transformer location is usually in the basement or mechanical room, possibly near an electrical panel)
    • Shut the power off in your house before attempting to do any work
    • Remove the old transformer and re-wire a new transformer the exact same way as it was before
  4. Low Voltage Wiring
    • If all of the previous steps don’t work, then you may have a damaged wire along the way, whether from the button to the chime or down to the transformer
    • The solution may be a splice where the wire is compromised or you may have to run all-new line

If all else fails, you can always bypass the existing system and purchase a wireless doorbell – then all you’ll have to worry about is changing the batteries every now and then!