How to Fix a Flat Bike Tire

Murphy’s Law stands to reason that if you haven’t used your bike in a while, odds are you may find a flat tire just when you want to take it out for a spin.

In this video, we’ll show you how to fix that flat tire so you can get back in the saddle.

Here’s the actual step-by-step for fixing a flat bike tire:

First you’ll want to identify if the tire itself is damaged or if it’s the inner tube.  If it’s the tube, you’ll want to deflate the tube, take a screwdriver and pry the tire off the rim–using your hand in conjunction with the screwdriver, the motion is essentially peeling away the tire.

Lay the tube on a flat surface and use an air pump to re-inflate it and identify where the leak is coming from.  The most economical solution is to use a self-adhesive patch kit.  These kits are small and affordable and a great item to keep on you when you’re out biking in the event the flat occurs “in the wild.”  Using the sandpaper in the kit, the key is to sand the rubber down to prepare it for applying the adhesive.  You can also use some rubbing alcohol on a rag to clean away the residue after sanding down the rubber.

Once it dries, apply the patch over the hole and use your finger to remove any air bubbles beneath.

All that’s left is to re-insert the tube in the tire, pull the stem through, and inflate to optimal pressure.  Now you can put the pedal to the metal.

Murphy’s Law stands to reason that if you haven’t used your bike in a while, odds are you may find a flat tire just when you want to take it out for a spin.

In this video, we’ll show you how to fix that flat tire so you can get back in the saddle.

Here’s the actual step-by-step for fixing a flat bike tire:

First you’ll want to identify if the tire itself is damaged or if it’s the inner tube.  If it’s the tube, you’ll want to deflate the tube, take a screwdriver and pry the tire off the rim–using your hand in conjunction with the screwdriver, the motion is essentially peeling away the tire.

Lay the tube on a flat surface and use an air pump to re-inflate it and identify where the leak is coming from.  The most economical solution is to use a self-adhesive patch kit.  These kits are small and affordable and a great item to keep on you when you’re out biking in the event the flat occurs “in the wild.”  Using the sandpaper in the kit, the key is to sand the rubber down to prepare it for applying the adhesive.  You can also use some rubbing alcohol on a rag to clean away the residue after sanding down the rubber.

Once it dries, apply the patch over the hole and use your finger to remove any air bubbles beneath.

All that’s left is to re-insert the tube in the tire, pull the stem through, and inflate to optimal pressure.  Now you can put the pedal to the metal.