How to Install a Tankless Water Heater

The simple answer is “hire a professional plumber.”  But seriously, if you’re in the market for a new water heater and have dreamed of a hot water on-demand system, then this video is for you.

The reason you’ll want a professional to handle this vs. DIY is that it will require a certain skill set to get the job done right, especially if you have a gas-powered system.  Plus, we’re dealing with extreme water pressure along with electricity so there’s any number of things that could go wrong if you try to do this yourself.

A brief history on tankless water heaters…believe it or not, these units have been around since the late 1800s.  However, it wasn’t until the 1970’s when the technology caught up with modern energy efficiency and at the time they really started to catch on in Europe as an alternative water heating method.  The U.S. finally caught on sometime in the 1990s and today they can be found in many homes throughout the country.

So when the time comes to install your new tankless water heater, there are some things that will be taken into consideration:

  • Location – do you have enough space to mount the unit to the wall?
  • Venting – before any of the water lines are run, the key is ensuring the unit is as close to the existing vent piping as possible – the plumber will do what’s called a “dry fit” to confirm the piping is fitted properly before gluing the connections in place
  • Sizing – whether you have 2 people or 20 people, knowing what sort of usage you expect will help determine what the capacity of your new water heater should be – this would include showers, the dishwasher, sink usage, etc. and how often (and for how long) hot water might be called for
  • Water and Gas Lines – both the intake and outflow lines are run and connected – as with the venting stage, it’s a two-step process of fitting then connecting
    • NOTE: you may have to request a larger capacity gas meter from your utility company… these units use a lot of BTUs (British Thermal Unit) to provide continuous hot water on demand

The simple answer is “hire a professional plumber.”  But seriously, if you’re in the market for a new water heater and have dreamed of a hot water on-demand system, then this video is for you.

The reason you’ll want a professional to handle this vs. DIY is that it will require a certain skill set to get the job done right, especially if you have a gas-powered system.  Plus, we’re dealing with extreme water pressure along with electricity so there’s any number of things that could go wrong if you try to do this yourself.

A brief history on tankless water heaters…believe it or not, these units have been around since the late 1800s.  However, it wasn’t until the 1970’s when the technology caught up with modern energy efficiency and at the time they really started to catch on in Europe as an alternative water heating method.  The U.S. finally caught on sometime in the 1990s and today they can be found in many homes throughout the country.

So when the time comes to install your new tankless water heater, there are some things that will be taken into consideration:

  • Location – do you have enough space to mount the unit to the wall?
  • Venting – before any of the water lines are run, the key is ensuring the unit is as close to the existing vent piping as possible – the plumber will do what’s called a “dry fit” to confirm the piping is fitted properly before gluing the connections in place
  • Sizing – whether you have 2 people or 20 people, knowing what sort of usage you expect will help determine what the capacity of your new water heater should be – this would include showers, the dishwasher, sink usage, etc. and how often (and for how long) hot water might be called for
  • Water and Gas Lines – both the intake and outflow lines are run and connected – as with the venting stage, it’s a two-step process of fitting then connecting
    • NOTE: you may have to request a larger capacity gas meter from your utility company… these units use a lot of BTUs (British Thermal Unit) to provide continuous hot water on demand