What to Put in a Car Emergency Kit

When you’re heading out to the highway, the goal is to get from point A to point B without incident.  However, it’s always a good idea to be prepared in the event your car breaks down.  Check out this video to see what to put in a car emergency kit.

  • First Aid Kit – you can buy one pre-made (like those that AAA sells) or make your own
  • Mobile Phone Charger – if your car is dead and your phone battery is too, you won’t be able to make those emergency calls
  • Emergency Numbers – in the event your phone has limited power, you may want to have essential phone numbers (family, friends, roadside assistance) handy in a written form
  • Documentation – from a notepad and pen/pencil for writing down directions to your vehicle’s owner’s manual for troubleshooting, you never know when you might need them
  • Jumper Cables – don’t let a dead battery keep you immobile
  • Fire Extinguisher – even a small version can come in handy if your breakdown involves fire, but remember the most important step is to get everyone out of the car safely and let the authorities handle the fire
  • Basic Tool Kit – a multi-tool or even a set of standard screwdrivers might be a good idea
  • Roadside Flares – hopefully, your car is off the road enough to avoid getting hit by other vehicles so let them see your car with flares
  • Car Jack & Lug Wrench – if roadside assistance isn’t an option you want to be able to change your flat tire with the spare
  • Foam Tire Sealant – this is great if a service station isn’t far
  • Tape – high-powered tape can help keep flapping
  • Coolant – if your car is overheating and a service station is within driving distance adding some coolant could help you limp into the finish line
  • Oil – low oil warning needs proper attention, so until you can trace the problem you’re better off adding some lest you blow out your engine block
  • Paper Towels & Wipes – all this DIY roadside activity is going to leave you dirty
  • Fuses – if your problem is electrical and you know your way around a car’s electrical system these may do the trick
  • Go Bag – if you’re going to be stranded for a lengthy period of time, you may also want to have some other essentials on hand:
    • Poncho
    • Blanket
    • Food
    • Water
  • Car Escape Tool – an extreme scenario yes, but this could mean the difference between life or death
  • Folding Shovel & Kitty Litter – in the colder months, you don’t want to get caught in a snow drift or get stuck in the snow

When you’re heading out to the highway, the goal is to get from point A to point B without incident.  However, it’s always a good idea to be prepared in the event your car breaks down.  Check out this video to see what to put in a car emergency kit.

  • First Aid Kit – you can buy one pre-made (like those that AAA sells) or make your own
  • Mobile Phone Charger – if your car is dead and your phone battery is too, you won’t be able to make those emergency calls
  • Emergency Numbers – in the event your phone has limited power, you may want to have essential phone numbers (family, friends, roadside assistance) handy in a written form
  • Documentation – from a notepad and pen/pencil for writing down directions to your vehicle’s owner’s manual for troubleshooting, you never know when you might need them
  • Jumper Cables – don’t let a dead battery keep you immobile
  • Fire Extinguisher – even a small version can come in handy if your breakdown involves fire, but remember the most important step is to get everyone out of the car safely and let the authorities handle the fire
  • Basic Tool Kit – a multi-tool or even a set of standard screwdrivers might be a good idea
  • Roadside Flares – hopefully, your car is off the road enough to avoid getting hit by other vehicles so let them see your car with flares
  • Car Jack & Lug Wrench – if roadside assistance isn’t an option you want to be able to change your flat tire with the spare
  • Foam Tire Sealant – this is great if a service station isn’t far
  • Tape – high-powered tape can help keep flapping
  • Coolant – if your car is overheating and a service station is within driving distance adding some coolant could help you limp into the finish line
  • Oil – low oil warning needs proper attention, so until you can trace the problem you’re better off adding some lest you blow out your engine block
  • Paper Towels & Wipes – all this DIY roadside activity is going to leave you dirty
  • Fuses – if your problem is electrical and you know your way around a car’s electrical system these may do the trick
  • Go Bag – if you’re going to be stranded for a lengthy period of time, you may also want to have some other essentials on hand:
    • Poncho
    • Blanket
    • Food
    • Water
  • Car Escape Tool – an extreme scenario yes, but this could mean the difference between life or death
  • Folding Shovel & Kitty Litter – in the colder months, you don’t want to get caught in a snow drift or get stuck in the snow